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Ashoona Ashoona and Alexa Hatanaka are bonded by their printmaking practices. It’s an appreciation that encompasses the tradition’s environmental and pedagogical sensibilities, as well their belief in artmaking as a community building tool, particularly with the youth in Kinngait, Nunavut, where they are both strongly affiliated.

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ᐊᑎᒌᑦ, ᓯᓚᐹᑦ Atigiit, Silapaat, 2019-2020

Washi, Seikosen washi, handmade South East Asian papers, sumi and oil-based ink, and forged iron (Baffin Island) ink, installation of ten collaborative garments, 2019–2020

As part of ongoing collective Kinngarni Katujjiqatigiit and Embassy of Imagination (2014-2020), a project by students of Attagoyuk Ilisavik and Peter Pitseolak School, Mary Alikatuktuk, Ooloosie Ashevak, Natalie Baird, Alexa Hatanaka, Flora Shum, Cie Taqiasuk and Nicotye Qimirpik, knowledge-sharers: Poisy Alogut, Ashoona Ashoona, Jesse Arnaqgaq, Adamie Ashevak, Mathewsie Ashevak, Amie Ishulutaq, Jaco Ishulutaq, Lasaloosie Ishulutaq, Maggie Lucy Kilabuk, Eena Kullualik, Siita Saila, Sarah Oshutsiaq, Elis Parr, Temela Pitsiulak, Patrick Thompson, Andrew Qappik, Madeleine Qumuatuq, Quvianaqtuliaq Taqaungai, Neevee Tapaungai and Julien Wallot-Beale"
In-progress views of Portrait of Pitseolak Ashoona, 2020.

Sumi-ink drawing and woodcut
Alexa’s grandmother, Mariko Hatanaka, enjoying Norman Vorano, Ming Tiampo, and Asato Ikeda, eds., Inuit Prints: Japanese Inspiration: Early Printmaking in the Canadian Arctic (Gatineau, QC: Canadian Museum of Civilization, 2011).

Photo: Alexa Hatanaka, 2014.

ASHOONA ASHOONA AND ALEXA HATANAKA