MOCA Toronto is Temporarily Closed for Exhibition Changeover

The Museum of Contemporary Art Toronto respectfully acknowledges that the Museum is located on the traditional land of the Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation, a place on which the Anishinaabe, the Chippewa, the Haudenosaunee, and the Wendat peoples have creatively expressed themselves since time immemorial.

Through our work and relations between people, cultures, geographies, outlooks, approaches, and natural forces, we recognize the importance of always reflecting on the continuing impacts of colonization. We acknowledge that legacies of colonialism are embedded within the institutional systems we work within today. It is more important than ever to question, deconstruct, and reimagine these structures and systems by putting equity, diversity, inclusion, justice, and Indigenous Truth and Reconciliation at their core.

As a cultural producer, we acutely acknowledge that Indigenous peoples have been uprooted, forced to adopt new languages and beliefs, and forbidden to perform their rituals and art in their homeland. We acknowledge that Indigenous peoples and land allies have long defended and nurtured our natural resources, co-habitants, and climate. We recognize their role and knowledge in forging a more sustainable future and the urgent need to heal and protect the land and the biodiversity it nourishes.

Today, many diverse First Nations, Inuit, and Métis people continue to thrive on this land. Tkaronto/Toronto, identified in the Museum’s official name, refers to a place where truths continue to unfold through art, activism, and ceremony. We honour these histories and our collective responsibility to protect and nurture the land and recognize Indigenous voices throughout the Museum’s programming.

The Museum of Contemporary Art Toronto respectfully acknowledges that the Museum is located on the traditional land of the Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation, a place on which the Anishinaabe, the Chippewa, the Haudenosaunee, and the Wendat peoples have creatively expressed themselves since time immemorial.

Through our work and relations between people, cultures, geographies, outlooks, approaches, and natural forces, we recognize the importance of always reflecting on the continuing impacts of colonization. We acknowledge that legacies of colonialism are embedded within the institutional systems we work within today. It is more important than ever to question, deconstruct, and reimagine these structures and systems by putting equity, diversity, inclusion, justice, and Indigenous Truth and Reconciliation at their core.

As a cultural producer, we acutely acknowledge that Indigenous peoples have been uprooted, forced to adopt new languages and beliefs, and forbidden to perform their rituals and art in their homeland. We acknowledge that Indigenous peoples and land allies have long defended and nurtured our natural resources, co-habitants, and climate. We recognize their role and knowledge in forging a more sustainable future and the urgent need to heal and protect the land and the biodiversity it nourishes.

Today, many diverse First Nations, Inuit, and Métis people continue to thrive on this land. Tkaronto/Toronto, identified in the Museum’s official name, refers to a place where truths continue to unfold through art, activism, and ceremony. We honour these histories and our collective responsibility to protect and nurture the land and recognize Indigenous voices throughout the Museum’s programming.