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Decolonize This Place

February 1, 2021
–February 28, 2021

Left: Decolonize This Place, 2nd Annual Anti-Columbus Day Tour at American Museum of Natural History, New York, October 9, 2017, live recording, 11′07″.
Right: Decolonize This Place, 3rd Anti-Columbus Day Tour ++ Action at American Museum of Natural History on Indigenous Peoples Day 2018, October 22, 2018, 01′59″.

This happened on October 9, 2017 and October 8, 2018
This is what we do
This is the work that has to happen

The epicentre in all instances is both the eye of the beholder and the storm.

Decolonize This Place (DTP) is a movement based in New York City that organizes around Indigenous rights, black liberation, Palestinian nationalism, de-gentrification and economic inequality. They practice connection to land and anti-colonial action that dismantle, disrupt and decolonize museums and cultural institutions within the art world.

The first video includes a land acknowledgement with strategies on how DTP takes a mob through an institution, complete with human mic, social choreography and arm signals. The second video is a high energy overview of the same event the following year.

We continue to see a sharp resurgence of social movements, within which artists and cultural workers are playing leading roles. Land, air, and water are central to decolonization.

Moving beyond politics that rely upon loose definitions of commonality, we instead mobilize complex differences to decenter whiteness, and enact reparations and repatriate land.

We prioritize the presence and work of people of color—challenging the white supremacy that continues to characterize the economies and institutions of art.

– Decolonize This Place on Movement Space

The following brochures are from the 4 Annual Anti-Columbus Day Tours from 2016, 2017, 2018 and 2019

Past Shift Key Programmes

A still from Cecilia Vicuña "Paracas" (1983)
Cecilia Vicuña
Paracas
A Still from Cauleen Smith "Pilgrim" (2017)
Cauleen Smith
Pilgrim
Mona Hatoum
Roadworks
Aura Satz
Preemptive Listening (Part 1: The Fork in the Road)